February

16

2017

AC Martin Partners was one of the first companies to purchase Ideate Sticky, which we introduced in 2015. Elisa de Dios, BIM Manager/ Production Coordinator and Associate at AC Martin, forwarded our launch video to her assistant, Henry Diaz, who walked right into her office and said, “What are you waiting for? We’re getting this, right?” He was certain that its ability to connect non-BIM data from Microsoft Excel into Revit models would save tremendous amount of time. He was correct.

AC Martin Partners, a Los Angeles-based architecture, planning, interior architecture, and research firm, uses Ideate Sticky mostly in the production phase and in construction documents.

“Because Ideate Sticky displays non-BIM tabular text in Revit, our team can quickly create and update those notes and code specifications, consultant data, and abbreviation lists in Excel, using the tool we already know,” says de Dios.

She continued, “If our project managers or project architects need to access or update the information on the Ideate Sticky schedule, they don’t have to go into the Revit model to check on files. That’s extremely important to our workflow, because not all project architects are Revit-savvy. We can also hand work to our administrative assistant, who doesn’t need to be Revit-savvy either.”

An average AC Martin project can consist of between 300 to 400 sheets, with perhaps a quarter of those created in Revit. “Someone used to spend hours in Revit typing line by line the sheets not already in Revit. Now an assistant can put it all together in Excel, which saves us significant project time,” said de Dios.

Companies throughout the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction industries use Ideate Sticky to “stick” Microsoft Excel files containing non-BIM data, such as code checklists, design data, and general notes, onto Revit project files, which are not able to manage or format non-BIM data. Ideate Sticky allows for formatting and editing in Excel or Revit, while maintaining graphical fidelity.

For more information on how AC Martin benefits from Ideate Sticky, view the case study. For more information on Ideate Sticky and other Revit software add-ins that help customers get the most out of their Revit software, visit the homepage of our website.

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February

14

2017

As an AEC Application Specialist with 18 years of experience, I have heard many customers discuss the challenges of deleting view-based elements in Autodesk Revit software. Fortunately, Ideate Explorer makes the process easy.

When working on Revit projects, it is common for project teams to add view-based elements, such as legends, schedules, sheets, and views, to the model as the project progresses. Some of these view-based elements are needed at one time, but not necessarily when moving forward with the project or when handing the finished model over to a consultant. It is in these instances that we are faced with the tedious task of cleaning up the non-essential, view-based elements from what has most likely become a very long list we all know as the Project Browser.

Ideate Software makes this task easier with the Navigate tab in Ideate Explorer, which gives us another way of accounting for all legends, schedules, sheets, and views in our Revit project.

To delete ALL view-based elements at once, simply follow the steps below. Please note that Revit will allow deletion of all views except for the active view. Therefore, skipping step #3 below will result in a warning from Ideate Explorer.

  1. Make a 3D model view your active view.
  2. Use Ideate Explorer to select all the items on the Navigate tab.
  3. De-select your active view.
  4. Use the delete button within Ideate Explorer to remove the selected view-based elements.

For a demonstration on how to use the Ideate Explorer Navigate tab to remove non-essential legends, schedules, sheets and views from your Revit model, click here.


About the Author

Katrina Vea Rodriguez, RA, AIA – AEC Application Specialist
Katrina is an AEC application specialist at the Ideate, Inc. San Francisco office. She is a California–licensed architect with a Bachelor of Science degree in Architecture from the University of the Philippines. Katrina has over 18 years of experience in the AEC industry with a focus on both commercial and hospitality projects. She is also a Revit Certified Professional with over 8 years of experience utilizing the software on both small and large scale projects, from programming to project close out.

 

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February

14

2017

We are happy to pass along word of a job opportunity. Our client,  Eppstein Uhen Architects (EUA), is looking for a Design Technology Specialist. EAU is a 109-year-old architecture firm headquartered in Milwaukee. It specializes in workplace, healthcare, learning, living, science and technology, and entertainment environments. 

EUA is looking for a third person to join its design team and work with BIM project teams in Milwaukee and Madison. The ideal candidate will be motivated, energetic, creative, and able to juggle multiple tasks in a fast-moving environment. Requirements include experience using Revit in an AEC practice environment; experience with Revit, AutoCAD, Navisworks, SketchUp, Lumion, and other similar software; and a general familiarity with Revit family content creation, design visualization, augmented and virtual reality, and building performance analysis applications.  

Here are highlights of the responsibilities:

  • Provide daily staff support, including participating in kick-off meetings, advising teams on applications and solutions, monitoring best practices and standards, and helping create project-specific content.
  • Assist with creating and managing the EUA Revit content library.
  • Participate in research and development of new design technologies.
  • Assist with maintaining and developing content for the EUA intranet.

The company employs almost 200 people who love what they do. It nurtures young talent and offers tools for learning and training. Its senior teams mentor its young professionals, and its young professionals inspire its senior leaders. Even its open workspaces encourage interaction and collaboration.

For details about this opportunity, including a link to apply, visit the post on  Revit JOBS on Blog Spot.

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February

1

2017

Do you need some fun and light listening material on the way to and from work?

BIMThoughts is podcast about BIM technology and techniques, and recently, they dedicated an entire podcast to a review of IdeateApps from Ideate Software.

BIM experts, Bill Debevc and Kristina Gardenhire, give an independent and honest look at IdeateApps. You can enjoy their light banter and helpful, but frank discussion about IdeateApps here.

Learn more about BIMThoughts, the team, and other important BIM topics.


About the Author

Richard W. Taylor - Associate AIA - Technical Evangelist Ideate Software
Richard Taylor has over 25 years of experience working for companies that develop architecture and engineering software solutions such as Intergraph, Bentley, and Autodesk. He has over 15 years of Revit experience and was part of the original development of Revit while at Revit Technology Corporation. He worked 12 years at Autodesk where he presented, taught, and worked to improve features in Revit. Richard holds both a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies and Masters of Architecture from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Richard is currently a Technical Evangelist for Ideate Software Solutions and continues to work with AEC clients worldwide, developing, and consulting on BIM solutions. In his spare time, he is active in his local community and is an elected member of the local Planning Board where he evaluates new developments, regional planning, and design criteria. @Rwtaylor_Revit

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January

10

2017

As a lead developer on Ideate XRay, which uncovers the reason an element isn’t visible in a certain view, I had to deal with a lot of visibility issues. Many of the issues dealt with the geometry of an element and its position within the model. To resolve these visibility issues, I had to learn a lot about bounding boxes and how they work within Revit.

Every model element in Revit represents an object that takes up space and has a position. To simulate this, Revit uses objects called “bounding boxes.” Revit defines a bounding box as an invisible 3D rectangular space that contains all a model element. These boxes are used to represent the geometry and position of an element, and they are important factors in the visibility of an element.



Behind the scenes, a bounding box is represented by the class “BoundingBoxXYZ.” This box has three main properties: Min, Max, and Transform. The Min and the Max are two points that represent the lower and upper bounds of the box, while the Transform represents its rotation relative to the model. These properties can be used to determine where an element is within a model by checking the coordinates of the element.

Views also have bounding boxes. A view’s bounding box represents the crop box of the view. In plan views, the crop box represents the sides of the view’s bounding box, while the view range represents the floor and ceiling of the view. For section and elevation views, the bounding box of the view represents the sides, while the depth is represented by the far clip offset.  

If the bounding box of an element does not intersect with the bounding box of a view in model space, the element will not be visible in that view. For most views, bounding box intersection is simple and only requires checking if the position of an element is within the bounding box of a view. Some views are not in alignment with the model coordinates and must use a transform. To check for element intersection in these cases, you would need to apply the inverse of the transform of the view onto the element to get the element’s position relative to the view.


 

A view’s visibility can also be effected by bounding boxes. Sometimes when placing a view in another view, like a section, the view marker is not visible. This can happen for a few reasons, and one of them is bounding boxes. If a floor plan has an elevation in it and the bounding box of the elevation intersects with the bounding box of the floor plan, the elevation marker will be visible within the floor plan.

With rotations, transforms, view coordinates, and model coordinates, things can become confusing very quickly, especially when all you want to do is figure out where your element went. IdeateApps’ XRay will check your element’s bounding box and use that information to help you resolve visibility issues. Download the trial version to see  how it simplifies the process of determining why an element isn’t visible in certain views.


About the Author

Alex Souza

Software Engineer with two years of experience. Part of the Ideate Software team that designs, develops, and tests applications that run within the Revit environment.

 

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