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February

14

2017

We are happy to pass along word of a job opportunity. Our client,  Eppstein Uhen Architects (EUA), is looking for a Design Technology Specialist. EAU is a 109-year-old architecture firm headquartered in Milwaukee. It specializes in workplace, healthcare, learning, living, science and technology, and entertainment environments. 

EUA is looking for a third person to join its design team and work with BIM project teams in Milwaukee and Madison. The ideal candidate will be motivated, energetic, creative, and able to juggle multiple tasks in a fast-moving environment. Requirements include experience using Revit in an AEC practice environment; experience with Revit, AutoCAD, Navisworks, SketchUp, Lumion, and other similar software; and a general familiarity with Revit family content creation, design visualization, augmented and virtual reality, and building performance analysis applications.  

Here are highlights of the responsibilities:

  • Provide daily staff support, including participating in kick-off meetings, advising teams on applications and solutions, monitoring best practices and standards, and helping create project-specific content.
  • Assist with creating and managing the EUA Revit content library.
  • Participate in research and development of new design technologies.
  • Assist with maintaining and developing content for the EUA intranet.

The company employs almost 200 people who love what they do. It nurtures young talent and offers tools for learning and training. Its senior teams mentor its young professionals, and its young professionals inspire its senior leaders. Even its open workspaces encourage interaction and collaboration.

For details about this opportunity, including a link to apply, visit the post on  Revit JOBS on Blog Spot.

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February

1

2017

Do you need some fun and light listening material on the way to and from work?

BIMThoughts is podcast about BIM technology and techniques, and recently, they dedicated an entire podcast to a review of IdeateApps from Ideate Software.

BIM experts, Bill Debevc and Kristina Gardenhire, give an independent and honest look at IdeateApps. You can enjoy their light banter and helpful, but frank discussion about IdeateApps here.

Learn more about BIMThoughts, the team, and other important BIM topics.


About the Author

Richard W. Taylor - Associate AIA - Technical Evangelist Ideate Software
Richard Taylor has over 25 years of experience working for companies that develop architecture and engineering software solutions such as Intergraph, Bentley, and Autodesk. He has over 15 years of Revit experience and was part of the original development of Revit while at Revit Technology Corporation. He worked 12 years at Autodesk where he presented, taught, and worked to improve features in Revit. Richard holds both a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies and Masters of Architecture from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Richard is currently a Technical Evangelist for Ideate Software Solutions and continues to work with AEC clients worldwide, developing, and consulting on BIM solutions. In his spare time, he is active in his local community and is an elected member of the local Planning Board where he evaluates new developments, regional planning, and design criteria. @Rwtaylor_Revit

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January

10

2017

As a lead developer on Ideate XRay, which uncovers the reason an element isn’t visible in a certain view, I had to deal with a lot of visibility issues. Many of the issues dealt with the geometry of an element and its position within the model. To resolve these visibility issues, I had to learn a lot about bounding boxes and how they work within Revit.

Every model element in Revit represents an object that takes up space and has a position. To simulate this, Revit uses objects called “bounding boxes.” Revit defines a bounding box as an invisible 3D rectangular space that contains all a model element. These boxes are used to represent the geometry and position of an element, and they are important factors in the visibility of an element.



Behind the scenes, a bounding box is represented by the class “BoundingBoxXYZ.” This box has three main properties: Min, Max, and Transform. The Min and the Max are two points that represent the lower and upper bounds of the box, while the Transform represents its rotation relative to the model. These properties can be used to determine where an element is within a model by checking the coordinates of the element.

Views also have bounding boxes. A view’s bounding box represents the crop box of the view. In plan views, the crop box represents the sides of the view’s bounding box, while the view range represents the floor and ceiling of the view. For section and elevation views, the bounding box of the view represents the sides, while the depth is represented by the far clip offset.  

If the bounding box of an element does not intersect with the bounding box of a view in model space, the element will not be visible in that view. For most views, bounding box intersection is simple and only requires checking if the position of an element is within the bounding box of a view. Some views are not in alignment with the model coordinates and must use a transform. To check for element intersection in these cases, you would need to apply the inverse of the transform of the view onto the element to get the element’s position relative to the view.


 

A view’s visibility can also be effected by bounding boxes. Sometimes when placing a view in another view, like a section, the view marker is not visible. This can happen for a few reasons, and one of them is bounding boxes. If a floor plan has an elevation in it and the bounding box of the elevation intersects with the bounding box of the floor plan, the elevation marker will be visible within the floor plan.

With rotations, transforms, view coordinates, and model coordinates, things can become confusing very quickly, especially when all you want to do is figure out where your element went. IdeateApps’ XRay will check your element’s bounding box and use that information to help you resolve visibility issues. Download the trial version to see  how it simplifies the process of determining why an element isn’t visible in certain views.


About the Author

Alex Souza

Software Engineer with two years of experience. Part of the Ideate Software team that designs, develops, and tests applications that run within the Revit environment.

 

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January

10

2017

First and foremost, Happy New Year to everyone!

Looking back and reflecting on 2016, I realized almost all the posts I have written are about technology – mostly Autodesk products, like Revit software. This time, I decided to change things up a little and talk about the importance of disconnecting and enjoying a little downtime. Quite the opposite, wouldn’t you say?

While I have always known the importance of leaving the phone behind and not answering emails, I still find myself compulsively checking my email at all hours of the day. Perhaps it has become a habit. Or maybe I am worried if I do not at least check my email, I will fall far behind, as if each one is urgent and needs an immediate response.

This past holiday break, my fiancée and I drove to the Northwestern corner of Montana to see her family and get away from everyday life. The drive through the mountains got me thinking about the lack of cell service, and the forced disconnection from technology. The beauty of these “dead-zones” is there are no interruptions and no temptations to look at your phone or to even expect a phone call for that matter. It’s just you and the people you are with, and that interaction is always important.

While we were in Montana for only a few days, it was the much-needed break from technology I was looking for. We went cross-country skiing and ran into a herd of sheep; hiked up to a small frozen waterfall; and drove on an unpaved, snow-covered logging road for over 40 miles to a small town to meet a friend for lunch. During this time, I was unable to connect to the outside world, which helped me focus on the most important things – fiancée, friends, family, relaxation, and the outdoors.

If you ever find yourself stressed out from the day-to-day routine, take time to unplug and enjoy some time outdoors, preferably far away from cell service. It will help you relax and focus on yourself and the people around you.

Here are some photos for inspiration:

Thank you for reading!


About the Author

Sash Kazeminejad - ACI, LEED AP AEC Senior Application Specialist Sash is a registered Architect and LEED Accredited Professional who holds a Master of Architecture from Montana State University. Sash’s experience includes project management, BIM management, and design for architectural firms in California, Montana, and Oregon. As an Autodesk Certified Instructor, Sash provides Revit Architecture training and solutions for AECO firms. @sashpdx

 

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December

22

2016

As a developer of add-in solutions for Autodesk Revit software, our goal is to help our customers get the most out of their Revit software investment. One way we do this is by meeting with users of our software as well as Revit software at Autodesk conferences. At last year’s Autodesk Revit Technology Conference (RTC), one person we spoke with was Tim Ekstrom, the BIM/CAD department leader for SSG MEP. SSG MEP offers a wide range of support for designing electrical, lighting, and low voltage systems for medical, municipal, educational, commercial, and transit facilities, as well as highways, roadways, and streetscapes.

Tim told us about some BIM line style standards that were not supported by our Revit add-in solution Ideate Sticky. Ideate Sticky lets Revit users “stick” Microsoft Excel files containing non-BIM data, such as code checklists, design data, and general notes, onto Revit project files, which are not able to manage or format non-BIM data.

Based on knowledge gained from several conversations with Tim, we realized that we had a great opportunity to increase the value of our software to Tim and many other users who must comply with those standards. Our software development team went to work, and in December of 2015 we added three new features to Ideate Sticky:


1.    Support for hidden rows and columns
2.    Support for additional line weights
3.    Support for images


And we didn’t stop there. We asked Tim for his thoughts on the updates, and he provided additional comments that led to further line refinements.

We appreciate Tim’s comments and welcome yours as well. You are deep into Revit software and Ideate Software products. If you are experiencing a challenge, chances are others are too. Please reach out to us at support@ideatesoftware.com.  

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